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E-Charge Wallet Review: Phone Charging Wallet

E-Charge Wallet Review: Phone Charging Wallet
2.3 (45%) 4 votes

E-Charge Wallet is an aluminum wallet that doubles as a smart phone charger. Does it work as advertised? Here is our E-Charge Wallet review.

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About E-Charge Wallet

E-Charge Wallet is a wallet that features an aluminum casing, a smart phone charger, and RFID blocking technology. The official website is echargewallet.com, with a registration date of April 2017. The screen capture below was taken of the product website in May 2017.

e-charge wallet review

Claims & Features

  • Has 2X the capacity of an average smart phone battery
  • Arrange cards and cash with the accordion design
  • Fashionable aluminum casing
  • Lighter than a regular wallet
  • Tolerates heat & cold
  • RFID blocking protection

Cost

E-Charge Wallet costs $19.99 + $2 web service fee for a total of $21.99. There is an optional double offer that adds a second wallet for an additional fee of $6.95 which would bring the total to $28.94. The wallet is available in either black or silver coloring, and comes with a universal charging cable. I found E Charge Wallet at a local Fry’s in Las Vegas in July 2017 for $19.99.

E-Charge Wallet Review

The As Seen on TV industry is a peculiar thing. As someone who monitors products moving through this revolving-door industry on a daily basis, the things I find every day never cease to amaze me. In the case of E-Charge Wallet, I am once again impressed at the industry’s ability to produce so many similar and competing products almost simultaneously.

In other words, E-Charge Wallet isn’t the first or only wallet like this currently being advertised. Power Plus Wallet appeared a few months ago, only to morph into Atomic Charge Wallet. Now with E-Charge Wallet it appears that another As Seen on TV marketer is in the arena offering a product with nearly identical features to Atomic Charge Wallet.

The key features of E-Charge Wallet are RFID blocking, a battery charger for devices, a tough aluminum case, and accordion interior organizer… the same features found in Atomic Charge Wallet.

As far as the RFID blocking feature goes, that was a big fad a couple of years ago, until experts began to point out that it was over-blown, and probably not even a real threat. It sounds good in advertising, though.

So we can scratch RFID blocking off of the useful features, which leaves us still with an external battery, accordion interior, and hard shell.

The accordion design and hard shell are going to be hit or miss with consumers. I’ve owned an accordion aluminum wallet before, and I ended up switching back to a regular wallet because it was perhaps too hard in my pocket. I also wasn’t fond of storing multiple cards in the same slot, and I missed having a bill compartment. Things get even more confusing when you read the instructions, which tell you not to use E-Charge Wallet in your pants pocket, and to remove it before sitting down.

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Additionally, I found that E-Charge Wallet can only hold about 4 cards, although the instructions say it can hold 7. The commercial shows it holding 6 cards and 4 cash bills, but when I tried to duplicate this, the wallet wouldn’t close. I could only fit a small number of items in the wallet in order to get it to close properly.

If you’re in the same boat as me regarding hard shell wallets, then that leaves the charging feature as the sole useful offering. For that, I will say that E-Charge Wallet is handy to have around in those cases that you need some extra juice for your phone. But again, there are caveats.

It takes about 4 – 6 hours to charge E-Charge Wallet, and then about 90 minutes to transfer that energy to your phone. In my case, using E-Charge Wallet only gave me about 50% more battery life with my iPhone 7 Plus. I expected to get a full charge, but that was the case. Nowhere on the packaging, device, or in the instructions does it say what the mAh rating is for this device, but I’m guessing it’s probably about 2,500 mAh.

I’m not sure if I’d sacrifice the conveniences of my regular wallet to make the switch, even if I were to gain extra battery power for my phone. If you don’t mind the aluminum/accordion design, and don’t carry more than about 4-5 cards with you, E-Charge Wallet could be a good fit for you. If they could make a stronger latch, I think more consumers would like this.

e charge wallet review

I tried to duplicate a demonstration shown in the commercial. When it was this full, however, the wallet wouldn’t close.

e charge wallet review

The accordion interior of E-Charge Wallet.

e charge wallet review

The power inputs on the side of E-Charge Wallet.

Alternatives

There are several other wallet chargers to be found online. This Nomad Wallet is an example. If you are simply interested in an aluminum wallet that doesn’t charge, you may want to pick up this Amazon Best Selling stainless steel wallet for $9.

Video Review

Below is my full video review of E-Charge Wallet.

You can also see E-Charge Wallet in the video below, where I compare it to the similar Atomic Charge Wallet.

Your E-Charge Wallet Reviews

What are your thoughts about E-Charge Wallet? Drop a comment below and a star rating above to let us know what you think about it.

Updated August 2017.

  • David Boucher

    I have just placed an order for the echarge wallet. 2 – 3 weeks deivery!!
    Totally unacceptable m- why can’t this be delivered in 2 days?
    Come on guys get your act together!!

    • Hasnogoats

      David – I agree. They should do business with Amazon so the customer can decide on the delivery time.

  • Jeffrey funk

    they need more colors to the product ; (

  • Matthew Shapiro

    I’m curious, what is that “universal charging cable” they talk about in the commercial? Is it genuinely “universal”, working for both Android and iOS?

    • The package only includes a cable to charge the wallet. The instructions tell you to use your device’s cable to charge your phone.

  • disqus_DLdvL3iSgB

    Should not have to have second one forced on you.

  • Hasnogoats

    ‘I expected to get a full charge, but that was the case.” Did you mean to say …but that was NOT the case.